Tag Archives: Andrew Nette

“Sticking It to the Man: Revolution and Counter-Culture” (PM Press; Australia)

Sunday, October 27, 2019

“If it’s not popular, it’s not culture.”
— Motto of the Popular Culture Association

Five years ago, the Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) published an article I had written about Los Angeles-based novelist and poet, Joseph Hansen, who was one of the co-founders of the half-century old Beyond Baroque Poetry Workshop. I had written the article as a response to a request from one of its editors, Zach Mann, who had first become familiar with Hansen’s writing in one of my graduate seminars. The article remains an essential complement to the commentary in my literary history, HOLDOUTS: The Los Angeles Poetry Renaissance 1948-1992 (University of Iowa Press).

I am pleased to report that the article on Hansen will be reprinted in a volume to be published in December in Australia, “Sticking It to the Man: Revolution and Counter-Culture.” Here is the ordering information. One can purchase an e-Book version, too.

“Sticking It to the Man: Revolution and Counterculture”
SKU: 9781629635248
Editors: Andrew Nette and Iain McIntyre
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 9781629635248
Published: 12/2019
Format: Paperback
Size: 8 x 10
Page count: 336
Subjects: History-Pop Culture/Literature-History and Criticism

https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=1012

FROM THE PM PRESS ANNOUNCEMENT:
Sticking It to the Man tracks the ways in which the changing politics and culture of the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s were reflected in pulp and popular fiction in the United States, the UK, and Australia. Featuring more than three hundred full-color covers, the book includes in-depth author interviews, illustrated biographies, articles, and reviews from more than two dozen popular culture critics and scholars.”

“These are the novels that provided us with our guiltiest reading pleasures of the mid-to-late Twentieth Century. They are reviewed by the critics who understand them best, and who give us lively insights into the historical and social forces in play as they were being written.”
—Ann Bannon, author of The Beebo Brinker Chronicles